KTBYTE Computer Science Academy

4 Militia Drive Lexington, Massachusetts, 02421 Locations: Online (view map)

Ages:
8 to 18 (Coed )
Type:
Virtual Program, After-school / weekend classes
Programs:
Specialty:
Computer (multi)
Cost:
$48 to $119 USD

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About this Camp

KTBYTE Computer Science Academy
 

KTBYTE provides computer science education that is fun, accessible, and challenging. Our instructor-led online classes, for students ages 8-18, are taught by dedicated and experienced instructors. Our online classes are live and interactive, just like in a regular classroom! Students use the KTCODER™, our proprietary platform with custom features that allows for a seamless online learning and coding experience. Students can see, hear, and text the teacher and other students. And unlike Zoom, the teacher can see and monitor all the student’s screens (we'll know if they're playing video games in class!).


The 2021 Experience at KTBYTE Computer Science Academy

We have moved all our classes to the online classrooms due to COVID-19. Our Lexington, MA school will not reopen until we receive further notice from the government.

View recent COVID-19 updates from KTBYTE Computer Science Academy

Programs and Sessions Calendar

Choose the right programs and sessions for your child; currently 7 programs available; 4 TBD.

Filter activities at this camp:

Name
Type/Gender
Specialty
Location
Date
Bus
Cost
Email
Virtual program
Coed
Ages: 13 - 18
Computer (multi) $1 to $1,398
Virtual Program,
Online
Feb 06-Jun 19$1 - $1,398
Virtual Program,
Online
Apr 10-Jun 12$1 - $1,398
Virtual Program,
Online
Jul 07-30 $1 - $1,398
Virtual Program,
Online
Aug 02-25 $1 - $1,398
JAVA|STEAM|STEM
Virtual program
Coed
Ages: 13 - 18
Computer (multi) $1 to $1,235
Virtual Program,
Online
Apr 08-Jun 10$1 - $1,235
Virtual Program,
Online
Apr 08-Jun 10$1 - $1,235
Virtual Program,
Online
Apr 10-Jun 12$1 - $1,235
Virtual Program,
Online
Apr 10-Jun 12$1 - $1,235
Virtual Program,
Online
Jun 07-Jul 30$1 - $1,235
Virtual Program,
Online
Jun 28-Jul 21$1 - $1,235
JAVA|STEAM|STEM
Virtual program
Coed
Ages: 9 - 18
Computer (multi) $1 to $600
Virtual Program,
Online
Jun 21-25 $1 - $600
Python|Scratch|STEAM|STEM
Virtual program
Coed
Ages: 8 - 18
Computer (multi) $1 to $851
Virtual Program,
Online
Jun 28-Aug 06$1 - $851
JAVA|Scratch|STEAM|STEM
Virtual program
Coed
Ages: 8 - 18
Computer (multi) $1 to $918
Virtual Program,
Online
Jun 28-Aug 06$1 - $918
Virtual Program,
Online
Jun 28-Jul 21$1 - $918
JAVA|Scratch|STEAM|STEM
Virtual program
Coed
Ages: 13 - 18
Computer (multi) $1 to $1,906
Virtual Program,
Online
Jun 29-Aug 24$1 - $1,906
AI (Artificial Intelligence)|Python|STEAM|STEM
Virtual program
Coed
Ages: 8 - 18
Computer (multi) $1 to $1,120
Virtual Program,
Online
Jul 07-30 $1 - $1,120
Virtual Program,
Online
Aug 02-25 $1 - $1,120
JAVA|STEAM|STEM
Virtual program
Coed
Ages: 13 - 18
Computer (multi)
Virtual Program,
Online
Date TBDCost TBD
JAVA|Instructor lead (group)|STEAM|STEM
Virtual program
Coed
Ages: 13 - 18
Computer (multi)
Virtual Program,
Online
Date TBDCost TBD
JAVA|Python|Math|STEAM|STEM
Virtual program
Coed
Ages: 8 - 18
Computer (multi)
Virtual Program,
Online
Date TBDCost TBD
JAVA|Scratch|Math|STEAM|STEM
Virtual program
Coed
Ages: 10 - 13
Computer (multi)
Virtual Program,
Online
Date TBDCost TBD
JAVA|Scratch|Math|STEAM|STEM
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Address
4 Militia Drive, Lexington, Massachusetts , United States
Other locations: Online

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KTBYTE Computer Science Academy
KTBYTE Computer Science Academy
4 Militia Drive Lexington, Massachusetts, 02421
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Reviews & Testimonials


Student Testimonial
Yavor — Camp alumni

I would rate it an 11 out of 10! I learned so much from KTBYTE summer camp and I was able to develop my very first video game! KTBYTE squeezed a semester worth of learning programming into a week, and yet I felt no difficulty understanding and applying what I’ve learned. The instructors are great, they are super nice and they taught us in a good pace.


Student Testimonials
Julia W — Camp alumni

I've learned a lot about how computers actually work; they're not something magical like I thought before. I also like programming because I'm breaking a stereotype about women and going beyond an expectation. KTBYTE provides great opportunities in this rapidly growing field


Student Testimonial
Patrick H — Camp alumni

KTBYTE helped me place into USA Computing Olympiad gold. My coding abilities helped me become a summer intern in a Computational Neuroscience lab at a Medical School. CS has served as a foundation for me to excel in all maths and sciences and has changed my frame of mind completely.


Student Testimonial
Patrick Z — Camp alumni

CS92 did get me into Platinum. In class, I learned many new algorithms, and realized I didn’t have to wait until college to learn these things. [The courses] are very friendly to beginners, as opposed to the majority of online resources that to know a huge amount of terminology when you’re just getting started.


Student Testimonial
Betsy — Camp alumni

KTBYTE taught me computer science, and computer science gave me the opportunity to participate in hackathons, organize events, get accepted to MIT PRIMES, and place in USACO Gold. All of which also helped me develop soft skills and organizational skills.


Student Testimonial
Jason Z — Camp alumni

If you’ve done something like KTBYTE classes up to a certain level, you don’t have to be a grad student to publish scientific papers or push the edge of existing genomic knowledge.


Student Testimonial
Kristen — Camp alumni

My school forced us to take CS in sixth grade, and honestly I hated it… but when I went to a KTBYTE summer [weeklong course], we were doing projects that really got me interested in the applications of coding. From that point on I actually liked CS.


Student Testimonial
Vishnu — Camp alumni

Everyone at KTBYTE has inspired me to be better in some way—whether it be coding, teaching, or just as a human.



Stories


Nature and Computer Science

In KTBYTE’s most recent sets of weekly competition problems, we chose the theme of Nature through Code to test contestants’ modeling and computer science skills. Individual problems focused on using semi-random Perlin noise to draw realistic landscapes, modeling the weather based on variable parameters, and investigating the recursive nature of trees and plants. While these types of problems draw from the skills taught in our core classes, they also give new programmers an opportunity to see the exciting intersection of nature and code. By gaining exposure to these questions at a young age, contestants are primed to wonder about the many ways computer science is used to understand the world around us.

Projects images from three of our competition problem sets

How can computers inspire students’ interests in natural science?

In nature there exist many complex phenomena including migration patterns, colonies of insects, and even the human brain. These systems at first glance may seem completely unrelated to a metal box of hardware, but upon closer inspection are actually not so foreign from computer algorithms. These examples from nature all involve some form of emergence, or an entity exhibiting properties that its parts do not have on their own. As the field of computer science continues to grow the gap between what we consider to be natural and artificial becomes smaller and smaller. 

Bee swarms are one example of collective behavior being studied by computer scientists

Kids often wonder how groups of animals can move so fluidly together, whether in nature or their favorite video game. The concept of herd mentality used to be thought of as specific to the behavior patterns of individual species. The reality is that many groups of animals can be modeled with simple rules, derived from individual motivations like self-preservation. These groups often demonstrate swarm intelligence, or the collective behavior of decentralized, self-organized systems. For example, flocking behavior can be described by rules for separation, alignment, and cohesion. Using these general rules a computer scientist named Craig Reynolds was able to simulate a flock of birds. With this technology we are able to not only simulate reality but create more intelligent software and robots, able to adapt to changing conditions.

A simulated flock modeled by the Boids algorithm

Can computer science be used to help the natural world?

Today’s parents face many questions about the future their children will inherit, especially in the face of climate change and increasing globalization. Ecosystems are ever-evolving, and it’s important for us to know how species are surviving or dying off. Better models and pattern recognition help us find this information. Computers have the capacity to hold a lot of information and present that information in a concise and readable format. In an article titled An ecological network approach to predict ecosystem service vulnerability to species losses, the complexity of an ecosystem is discussed along with the implications of changing ecosystems. This research attempts to find long term potential problems and helping to effect change before it’s too late. We know that climate change, endangered species, and pandemics are dangerous but what if we could address these before they become unsolvable? With nature-inspired algorithms and the power of modeling different outcomes people can come one step closer to helping the earth and ourselves. 

Computer can help us understand the many relationships in an ecosystem

KTBYTE students of all experience levels learn to see the applications of code beyond more complex computer programs. From the most beginner class to advanced competition prep, students apply their new skills to story problems derived from the natural world. Much like the synergy present in natural systems, we hope to inspire the collective curiosity of young problem-solvers to explore different aspects of their surroundings. By building confidence through excellence in the newest generation of computer scientists we can improve our understanding of nature and our relationship with the Earth.

...



Rachel Man Student Feature

Rachel has been a KTBYTE student since 2017, when she first joined us for a CS00a course. Since then she has completed many of our most difficult classes including Advanced Machine Learning and USACO Silver. Perhaps most impressively, Rachel was recently accepted to Carnegie Mellon University's School of Computer Science (SCS). In this KTBYTE student feature Rachel talks us through her experiences learning computer science and applying to universities. We are so proud of Rachel and wish her the best as she continues her educational journey!

Rachel at AAS

Rachel received the Topcoder Disruptive Technology Award (2nd Place) at the 2019 Academy of Applied Science Competition

1. Why did you choose CMU, and specifically, what made you decide on the CS Program? 

Carnegie Mellon is pretty well known for its CS program. The environment feels extremely collaborative due to the small class size, different from that of a school like Berkeley, where the class size is so large that students may feel lost. CMU is also one of two schools which has an entire school dedicated to computer science instead of just a subfield in a school of engineering/arts and sciences. Generally, applicants who apply Early Decision also have a potentially increased chance at acceptance, and applicants usually apply to reach schools/ivies for their early round, and Carnegie Mellon CS was that “reach school with a low acceptance rate” ED shot for me. CMU SCS seems very theory-based and research-based (with no shortage of entrepreneurship opportunities), and I am very excited to take advantage of those resources.

2. How did you get into CS?

I grew up in a strict Asian household and was sadly not allowed to play video games in my childhood. In my first KTBYTE course, the first final project that I completed was making my own video game. I think that having that taste of freedom was the gateway that led me into CS. 

3.  When did you first start with KTBYTE, and how did it help you? 

8th grade-classes at KTBYTE definitely made me more confident in my ability to program and gave me lots of background when I had to take CS courses in my high school and take the AP CS exam. I also met many amazing connections at KTBYTE through the robotics team.

4. What have you been most challenged by while learning how to program? 

There's all kinds of stuff: the same self-sabotaging mental block that people sometimes get with math, or finding a product/library so obscure that you can't use it even though it might fit perfectly with your project. CS is all about problem-solving, and it's often challenging to break down a problem into programmable parts of a solution.

5. What was the most difficult part of applying to colleges this year? Do you have any tips? 

  • Start your common app early and aim to complete the common app essay by the end of Junior summer. Procrastination is your enemy in the college apps process.
  • Create a spreadsheet of the experiences you've had (awards/camps/projects). Write down the start/end date and maybe a couple sentences on specific aspects that you found interesting. That way you can potentially recall and write about those moments later in supplemental essays.
  • Try to tour colleges if possible and write down things you really enjoyed or found unique about each school. Colleges usually have “Why This School?” essays where you need to explore this.
  • Create a spreadsheet for each college's supplemental essays, and plan out the supplement-writing process in a way that allows you to fill in the most amount of supplemental “slots” with the fewest essays.

6. You mentioned you have some passion projects – what do you plan to do between now and college? 

Some things I'm thinking about: putting out a game demo on Kickstarter, applying for some student grants, replicating the iconic screaming roomba, moderating or contributing towards some zines, catching up on sleep, and partnering up with some CMU students to attend hackathons.

7. Reflecting on your CS/robotics education, what were the most enjoyable projects you've worked on? 

I was a game developer for a visual novel that took a year to produce, a process that spiraled into lengthy 200-page color-coded documents, 4 A.M. lore discussions, and so many beta-testing error screens. The process itself had highs and lows, but the amount of payoff that I got when completing a finished product made the entire process worth the effort! I also vividly remember going to my first hackathon (Metrohacks) and presenting a series of short visual demos with another KTBYTE student. Both the crunch and teamwork were aspects of a hackathon that I wanted to return to. I love the moment when I present my project for the judges, getting shot back with a question about a potential problem with my invention, only for me to counter with a solution that I either thought of on the spot or prepared beforehand.

8. You've had some leadership roles in the last few years. Which ones were your favorite and how have they helped you?

I'm a director of a non-profit organization which focuses on giving platforms to neurodivergent individuals. Everyone on the team is extremely ambitious-we publish podcasts, webinars, research papers, art, websites, etc. It's an exciting and collaborative environment where anything I pitch becomes suddenly possible. I also have a ton of leadership experience playing in the Boston Youth Symphony. Over the years, I think that my positions in BYS have led me to gain a constant awareness of my surroundings and a sense of blind courage and faith in my own gestures.

...



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